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19% kids remained out of school last year - The Express Tribune

Report shows share of private ones fell by 4% against year 2019


ISLAMABAD:

Around 19% of children in the country remained out of school last year whereas the share of private ones fell by 4% comparison with the year 2019, according to a report launched on Thursday.

The Annual Status of Education Report (ASER) 2021 further revealed that the drop-out rate in government schools had fallen because of the increase in the number of teachers and improvement in classrooms conditions.

It added that 81% of children were enrolled in government schools whereas 19% were going to private ones.

The enrolment edge in government schools poses new challenges for supply side actions in terms of facilities and more spaces and teachers for children who can be accommodated, attend and learn above all in public sector as their fundamental entitlement.

The report was based on citizen-led household survey. The Idara-e-Taleem-o-Aagahi (ITA) conducted the survey in joint collaboration with around 20 organisations. A total of 1,000 volunteers visited 152 districts in 4,420 villages to conduct the ASER survey involving 87,415 households and 247,978 children aged between 3 and 16 years.

The survey found out that in the country’s rural areas, 212,105 children, aged between 5 and 16 years, were competent in Urdu, Sindhi or Pashto according to the areas they lived in, as well as in English and arithmetic as per their curriculum and textbooks.

The report has been annually informing about the progress and challenges for Article 25 A of the Constitution extending education for all pupils aged between 5 and 16 years since 2010 and for tracking progress towards sustainable development goal number 4, measuring learning at the lower primary level.

Learning lies at the heart of the education enterprise but because of the pandemic and school closures, ASER rural results for 2021 reflect a drop in enrollment for the age group 3 to 5 and 6 to 16 years.
For the first time during Covid-19 pandemic, there are more boys in Punjab dropping out of school.

These boys are presumably going to child labour and dropping out of schools.

The Early Childhood Education (ECE) has been historically tracked by ASER Pakistan.

From 2014 when the ECE enrolment stood at 39%, it has registered a marginal decline to 38% in 2021. The report stated that although ECE was critical for foundational learning readiness in literacy and numeracy, but remains largely ignored as a holistic sub-sector addressing the physical, socio-emotional and cognitive domains.

According to the rural portion of the report, the student competencies in learning language and arithmetic have declined to 55% of class 5 children, who could read a class 2-level story in Urdu, Sindhi or Pashto against 59% in 2019.

A total of 51% class 5 children could solve two-digit division against 57% in 2019.

Only for English, the learning levels have improved marginally. A total of 56% class 5 children could read sentences (class 2-level) against 55% in 2019.

Children enrolled in private schools are performing better in literacy in comparison with their government counterparts. Boys are outperforming girls; however, in numeracy, both sectors are at par. Foundational learning trailing from grade 3 remains compromised in grade 5 and even in grade 8 as learning poverty is on the rise.

The report highlights that while children in private schools taking tuition has remained at the same level 22% as in 2019, paid coaching has recorded a massive jump for children in government schools from 6% in 2019 to 20% in 2021. The increase in tuition in government schools by 14% during Covid-19 is a burden on poor households.

Children’s learning support from family members stood at 68%, 57% of them availed PTV teleschool sessions, 37% had access to smartphones followed by 29% with access to a computer. A total of 27% paid tuition, 14% used digital learning resources and 6% accessed radio programmes.

https://tribune.com.pk/story/2347310/19-kids-remained-out-of-school-last-year

 

 

19% children remained out of school in 2021: ASER report - Pakistan Observer

In Pakistan, 19 percent children remained out of school in 2021 while 40 percent of government and 23 percent of private schools imparted multi-grade teaching till grade 8.

As per the report, 81 percent children were enrolled in government schools whereas 19 percent were going to non-state institutions, 1 percent in Madrassah.

The share of private schools has been dropped by 4 percent as compared with year 2019. The report highlights that whilst children in private schools taking tuition has remained at the same level 22 percent as in 2019, paid coaching has recorded a massive jump for children in government schools from 6 percent in 2019 to 20 percent in 2021 Increase in tuition in government schools by 14 percent during COVID-19 is a burden on poor households.

This enrolment edge in government schools poses new challenges for supply side actions in terms of facilities and more spaces and teachers for children who can be accommodated, attend and learn above all in public sector as their fundamental entitlement. The report was based on citizen-led household survey. The Idara-e-Taleem-o-Aagahi (ITA) conducted the survey report in joint collaboration with around 20 organizations and 1,000 volunteer citizens visited 152 districts in 4420 villages to implement the ASER survey from 87,415 households and 247,978 children of age 3-16 years.

per report, for the year 2021, the ASER rural survey assessed 212,105 children of 5-16 year age in Language (Urdu/Sindhi/Pashto), English, and Arithmetic competencies mapped to the Curriculum and Textbooks.

The report till date has further annually informed about the progress and challenges for Article 25 A of the constitution extending education for All 5-16 year old children since 2010 and for tracking progress towards SDG 4, measuring learning at the lower primary level.

Learning lies at the heart of the education enterprise but because of the pandemic and school closures, ASER rural results for 2021 reflect a drop in enrollment for age group 3-5 and 6-16 years.The share of private schools dropped by 4 percent as compared to year 2019.This enrolment edge in government schools poses new challenges for supply side actions in terms of facilities and more spaces and teachers for children who can be accommodated, attend and learn above all in public sector as their fundamental entitlement.

For the first time during COVID there are more boys which were skewed due to data from Punjab. Boys are presumably going to child labor and dropping out of schools.

https://pakobserver.net/19-children-remained-out-of-school-in-2021-aser-report/

 

19pc children remained out of school in 2021 - The News

Islamabad : The 19 per cent of children remained out of school in 2021 while the 40 per cent of government and 23 per cent of private schools imparted multi-grade teaching till grade 8 while multi-grade in grade 2 and 8 has been dropped in government schools due to improved number of teachers and classrooms, said Annual Status of Education Report (ASER) 2021 launched here on Thursday.

As per report, 81 per cent of children were enrolled in government schools whereas 19 per cent were going to non-state institutions, one in ‘Madrassa’. The share of private schools has been dropped by 4 per cent as compared with year 2019.

This enrolment edge in government schools poses new challenges for supply side actions in terms of facilities and more spaces and teachers for children who can be accommodated, attend and learn above all in public sector as their fundamental entitlement.

The report was based on citizen-led household survey. The Idara-e-Taleem-o-Aagahi (ITA) conducted the survey report in joint collaboration with around 20 organisations and 1,000 volunteer citizens visited 152 districts in 4,420 villages to implement the ASER survey from 87,415 households and 247,978 children of age 3-16 years.

As per report, for the year 2021, the ASER rural survey assessed 212,105 children of 5-16 year age in language (Urdu/Sindhi/Pashto), English, and arithmetic competencies mapped to the curriculum and textbooks.

The report till date has further annually informed about the progress and challenges for Article 25 A of the constitution extending education for All 5-16 year old children since 2010 and for tracking progress towards SDG 4, measuring learning at the lower primary level. Learning lies at the heart of the education enterprise but because of the pandemic and school closures, ASER rural results for 2021 reflect a drop in enrollment for age group 3-5 and 6-16 years. The share of private schools dropped by 4 per cent as compared to year 2019. This enrolment edge in government schools poses new challenges for supply side actions in terms of facilities and more spaces and teachers for children who can be accommodated, attend and learn above all in public sector as their fundamental entitlement.

For the first time during COVID there are more boys which were skewed due to data from Punjab. Boys are presumably going to child labor and dropping out of schools. Vulnerability of our children is on the increase. The Early Childhood Education (ECE) has been historically tracked by ASER Pakistan. From 2014 when ECE enrolment stood at 39 per cent it has registered marginal decline 38 per cent in 2021). The report stated that although ECE was a critical for foundational learning readiness in literacy and numeracy, but remains largely ignored as a holistic sub-sector addressing the physical, socio-emotional and cognitive domains.

According to the rural portion of the report, te student competencies in learning Language and Arithmetic have declined 55 per cent of class 5 children could read a class 2 level story in Urdu/Sindhi/Pashto compared to 59 per cent in 2019. The 51 per cent class 5 children could do two digit division as compared to 57 per cent in 2019.

Only for English, the learning levels have improved marginally. The 56 per cent class 5 children could read sentences (class 2 level) compared to 55 per cent in 2019. Children enrolled in private schools are performing better in literacy compared to government counterparts and boys outperform girls; however, in numeracy both sectors are at par. Foundational learning trailing from grade 3 remains compromised in grade 5 and even in grade 8. Learning Poverty is on the rise.

The report highlights that whilst children in private schools taking tuition has remained at the same level 22 per cent as in 2019, paid coaching has recorded a massive jump for children in government schools from 6 per cent in 2019 to 20 per cent in 2021. Increase in tuition in government schools by 14 per cent during COVID-19 is a burden on poor households.

Learning support from a high of 68 per cent learning support from family members, 57 per cent availed PTV teleschool sessions, 37 per cent had access to smart phones, followed by 29 per cent with access to computer, 27 per cent to paid tuition, 14 per cent digital learning resources and 6 per cent accessed radio programmes. The support from family in learning during covid-19 (68 per cent) is a sign of hope for bridging the home-school divide. distance/edtech learning solutions must be developed further. teleschool coverage shows increase from 35 per cent in March 2021 to 57 per cent in November 2021.

The ASER report further highlighted that school functioning across every district in Pakistan. Overall teacher attendance in surveyed government schools was 90 per cent, whereas it was 92 per cent in private schools on the day of the survey. Whilst private school teachers were reported to have better qualifications at graduate levels (37 per cent) compared to 32 per cent in government schools; however, for MA/MSC qualifications, a larger percentage of public sector teachers (27 per cent) have a higher qualification than private counterparts (21 per cent). The 77 per cent private primary schools had boundary-walls as compared to 75 per cent government primary schools; for functional toilets, the facility was available in 70 per cent public and 71 per cent private primary schools; safe and conducive environments do affect learning positively across public and private schools. The government must make missing facilities an integral part of school based budgets and not a separate budget head.

The ASER 2021 school level survey, included a ‘Health and Disability’ section; head teachers/teachers were asked questions pertaining to Children with Disabilities (CWDs) and appropriate facilities in their respective schools. Overall, 21 per cent of the surveyed government schools reported having children with disabilities, compared to 24 per cent private schools.

The ICT’s ASER 2021 collected information on important civic, social safety net support and 21st century indicators. The technology profile of households is changing rapidly. Compared to 2019 when 66 per cent of HHs (rural) who had cell phones, there are 77 per cent households in 2021. 62 per cent have smart phones. Amongst mobile users, 89 per cent use WhatsApp services, whilst 64 per cent use SMS facility. The 23 per cent have internet connection and 18 per cent have computer/laptops. 65 per cent households have TV and 18 per cent have radio.

Social safety nets are being offered to 16 per cent of the population against 12 per cent from 2019. The 16 per cent households stated that their earnings during COVID were affected by more than 50 per cent and 30 per cent households stated that their psychological well-being was substantially affected during COVID. ASER Pakistan, collects information from children on learning and other critical indicators across rural and urban households alongside schools producing internationally comparable data on the acquisition of foundational lower primary skills, holding national and global-level institutions accountable for delivering on the SDG 4 promises.

ASER Pakistan, not only collects data to highlight education challenges across the country, it identifies the most under-privileged areas within Pakistan, surviving under extreme poverty, where girls in rural areas, and the disabled are likely to be most vulnerable. Evidence on learning, disaggregated by geography, gender, inclusion and wealth, generated by ASER/ITA annually propels democratically elected governments to target, plan and spend better with measurable positive outcomes so that they live up to their manifesto promises.

https://www.thenews.com.pk/print/940426-19pc-children-remained-out-of-school-in-2021

 

Speakers for urgent actions for educated Pakistan - Daily Times

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ASER Pakistan Report 2021, largest annual citizen-led household based survey, was launched in Islamabad on Thursday March 10, 2022.

Released jointly by Mr. Shafqat Mahmood, Federal Minister for Education & Professional Training, parliamentarians across political parties, members from civil society and media experts, there was a unanimous consensus for urgent actions to be taken for a future based on an educated Pakistan to halt the protracted devaluing of its social capital.

ASER Pakistan is a flagship program of Idara-e-Taleem-o-Aagahi (ITA) implemented in partnership with 20 civil society organizations and NCHD; 11,000 volunteer citizens visited 152 districts in 4420 villages to implement the ASER survey from 87,415 households and 247,978 children of age 3-16 years. For the year 2021, the ASER rural survey assessed 212,105 children of 5-16 year age in Language (Urdu/Sindhi/Pashto), English, and Arithmetic competencies mapped to the Curriculum and Textbooks.

ASER 2021 was conducted from September-November 2021, a rare period of ‘back to school’ in relative continuity during COVID-19, barring brief school closures in some districts of the country.

The report till date has further annually informed about the progress and challenges for Article 25 A of the constitution extending education for ALL 5-16 year old children since 2010 and for tracking progress towards SDG 4, measuring learning at the lower primary level.

Learning lies at the heart of the education enterprise but because of the pandemic and school closures, ASER rural results for 2021 reflect a drop in enrollment for age group 3-5 and 6-16 years.

Enrolment: In 2021, 19% of children were reported to be out-of-school which has increased when compared to 2019 (17%). 81% of all school-aged children within the age bracket of 6-16 years were enrolled in schools. Amongst these, 81% (77% in 2019) of children were enrolled in government schools whereas 19% (23% in 2019) were going to non-state institutions (18% private schools, 1% Madrassah, 0% others). The share of private schools has dropped by 4% compared with 2019.This enrolment edge in government schools poses new challenges for supply side actions in terms of facilities and more spaces and teachers for children who can be accommodated, attend and learn above all in public sector as their fundamental entitlement.

More Boys Out of School – During COVID: For the first time during COVID there are more OOS Boys which is skewed due to data from Punjab. Boys are presumably going to child labor and dropping out of schools. Vulnerability of our children is on the increase. Early Childhood Education (ECE) has been historically tracked by ASER Pakistan. From 2014 when ECE enrolment stood at 39%, it has registered marginal decline (38% in 2021), although ECE is critical for foundational learning readiness in literacy and numeracy, but remains largely ignored as a holistic sub-sector addressing the physical, socio-emotional and cognitive domains.

Learning Levels: According to the rural report, student competencies in learning Language and Arithmetic have declined: 55% of class 5 children could read a class 2 level story in Urdu/Sindhi/Pashto compared to 59% in 2019. 51% class 5 children could do two digit division as compared to 57% in 2019. Only for English, the learning levels have improved marginally. 56% class 5 children could read sentences (class 2 level) compared to 55% in 2019. Children enrolled in private schools are performing better in literacy compared to government counterparts and boys outperform girls; however, in numeracy both sectors are at par. Foundational learning trailing from grade 3 remains compromised in grade 5 and even in grade 8! Learning Poverty is on the rise.

Private Tuitions: The ASER 2021 rural survey highlights that whilst children in private schools taking tuition has remained at the same level (22%) as in 2019, paid coaching has recorded a massive jump for children in government schools from 6% in 2019 to 20% in 2021! Increase in tuition in government schools by 14 % during COVID-19 is a burden on poor households.

Learning Support Responses during COVID-19 by Children (5-16 years): Learning support from a high of 68% learning support from family members, 57 % availed PTV TeleSchool sessions, 37% had access to smart phones, followed by 29% with access to computer, 27% to paid tuition, 14% digital learning resources and 6% accessed radio programs. Support from family in learning during COVID-19 (68%) is a sign of hope for bridging the Home-School Divide. Distance /EdTech learning solutions must be developed further. TeleSchool coverage shows increase from 35% in March 2021 to 57% in November 2021!

Multi-grade Declines in Govt. Schools. ASER 2021 National rural findings reveal 40% of government and 23% of private schools impart multi-grade teaching at grade 2 level; whilst in grade 8, 6% of surveyed government schools and 19% of surveyed private schools had class 8 sitting with other classes. Multi-grade in Grade 2 and 8 has dropped in Government Schools due to improved number of teachers and classrooms.

School Facilities: The ASER report further highlights school functioning across every district in Pakistan. Overall teacher attendance in surveyed government schools was 90%, whereas it was 92% in private schools on the day of the survey. Whilst private school teachers were reported to have better qualifications at graduate levels (37%) compared to 32% in government schools; however, for MA/MSC qualifications, a larger percentage of public sector teachers (27%) have a higher qualification than private counterparts (21%).

Facilities Gap Narrows across Govt and Private Schools: 77% private primary schools had boundary-walls as compared to 75% government primary schools; for functional toilets, the facility was available in 70% public and 71% private primary schools; safe and conducive environments do affect learning positively across public and private schools. The government must make missing facilities an integral part of school based budgets and not a separate budget head.

Health and Disability: ASER 2021 school level survey, included a “Health and Disability” section; head teachers/teachers were asked questions pertaining to Children with Disabilities (CWDs) and appropriate facilities in their respective schools. Overall, 21% of the surveyed government schools reported having children with disabilities, compared to 24% private schools.Social Safety Nets through Ehsas/BISP etc. increased from 10 % coverage in 2019 in rural areas to 16% in 2021 to offset fragile households during COVID-19. This is a very promising trend of targeting the poor out of poverty in Pakistan.

https://dailytimes.com.pk/898888/speakers-for-urgent-actions-for-educated-pakistan/

 

 

کرونا سے تعلیمی نظام متاثر 19 فیصد بچے اب بھی سکولوں سے باہر- Daily Ausaf

https://www.dailyausaf.com/epaper/popup.php?newssrc=issues/2022-03-11/156607/p_809.gif

Annual Status Of Education In Pakistan - Thinkers

The 19 percent of children remained out of school in 2021 while the 40 percent of government and 23 percent of private schools imparted multi-grade teaching till grade 8 while multi-grade in grade 2 and 8 has been dropped in government schools due to improved number of teachers and classrooms, said Annual Status Of Education Report (ASER) 2021 launched here on Thursday.

As per report, 81 percent of children were enrolled in government schools whereas 19 percent were going to non-state institutions, 1 in Madrassah. The share of private schools has been dropped by 4 percent as compared with year 2019. This enrolment edge in government schools poses new challenges for supply side actions in terms of facilities and more spaces and teachers for children who can be accommodated, attend and learn above all in public sector as their fundamental entitlement.

The report was based on citizen-led household survey. The Idara-e-Taleem-o-Aagahi (ITA) conducted the survey report in joint collaboration with around 20 organizations and 1,000 volunteer citizens visited 152 districts in 4420 villages to implement the ASER survey from 87,415 households and 247,978 children of age 3-16 years. As per report, for the year 2021, the ASER rural survey assessed 212,105 children of 5-16 year age in Language (Urdu/Sindhi/Pashto), English, and Arithmetic competencies mapped to the Curriculum and Textbooks.

The report till date has further annually informed about the progress and challenges for Article 25 A of the constitution extending education for All 5-16 year old children since 2010 and for tracking progress towards SDG 4, measuring learning at the lower primary level.

Learning lies at the heart of the education enterprise but because of the pandemic and school closures, ASER rural results for 2021 reflect a drop in enrollment for age group 3-5 and 6-16 years.

The share of private schools dropped by 4 percent as compared to year 2019. This enrolment edge in government schools poses new challenges for supply side actions in terms of facilities and more spaces and teachers for children who can be accommodated, attend and learn above all in public sector as their fundamental entitlement.

For the first time during COVID there are more boys which were skewed due to data from Punjab. Boys are presumably going to child labour and dropping out of schools. Vulnerability of our children is on the increase.

The Early Childhood Education (ECE) has been historically tracked by ASER Pakistan. From 2014 when ECE enrolment stood at 39 percent, it has registered marginal decline to 38 percent in 2021. The report stated that although ECE was a critical for foundational learning readiness in literacy and numeracy, but remains largely ignored as a holistic sub-sector addressing the physical, socio-emotional and cognitive domains.

According to the rural portion of the report, the student competencies in learning Language and Arithmetic have declined to 55 percent of class 5 children could read a class 2 level stories in Urdu/Sindhi/Pashto, compared to 59 percent in 2019.

The 51 percent of class 5 children could do two digit division, as compared to 57 percent in 2019. Only for English, the learning levels have improved marginally. The 56 percent of class 5 children could read sentences (class 2 level) compared to 55 percent in 2019. Children enrolled in private schools are performing better in literacy compared to government counterparts and boys outperform girls; however, in numeracy both sectors are at par. Foundational learning trailing from grade 3 remains compromised in grade 5 and even in grade 8! Learning Poverty is on the rise.

The report highlights that whilst children in private schools taking tuition has remained at the same level of 22 percent as in 2019, paid coaching has recorded a massive jump for children in government schools from 6 percent in 2019 to 20 percent in 2021 Increase in tuition in government schools by 14 percent during COVID-19 is a burden on poor households.

Learning support from a high of 68 percent learning support from family members, 57 % availed PTV teleschool sessions, 37 percent had access to smart phones, followed by 29 percent with access to computer, 27 percent to paid tuition, 14 percent digital learning resources and 6 percent accessed radio programs. The support from family in learning during covid-19 (68 percent) is a sign of hope for bridging the home-school divide. Distance / edtech learning solutions must be developed further. Teleschool coverage shows an increase from 35 percent in March 2021 to 57 percent in November 2021.

The Annual Status of Education report further highlighted that school functioning across every district in Pakistan. Overall teacher attendance in surveyed government schools was 90 percent, whereas it was 92 percent in private schools on the day of the survey. Whilst private school teachers were reported to have better qualifications at graduate levels (37 percent) compared to 32 percent in government schools; however, for MA/MSC qualifications, a larger percentage of public sector teachers (27%) have a higher qualification than private counterparts (21 percent).

The 77 percent private primary schools had boundary-walls as compared to 75 percent government primary schools; for functional toilets, the facility was available in 70 percent public and 71 percent private primary schools; safe and conducive environments do affect learning positively across public and private schools. The government must make missing facilities an integral part of school based budgets and not a separate budget head.

The ASER 2021 school level survey, included a “Health and Disability” section; head teachers/teachers were asked questions pertaining to Children with Disabilities (CWDs) and appropriate facilities in their respective schools. Overall, 21 percent of the surveyed government schools reported having children with disabilities, compared to 24 percent of private schools.

The ICT’s Annual Status of Education report 2021 collected information on important civic, social safety net support and 21st century indicators. The technology profile of households is changing rapidly. Compared to 2019 when 66 percent of HHs (rural) who had cell phones, there are 77 percent of households in 2021. Sixty-two percent have smartphones. Amongst mobile users, 89 percent use WhatsApp services, whilst 64% use SMS facility. The 23 percent have internet connection and 18 percent have computer/laptops. 65% of households have TV and 18 percent have radio. Social safety nets are being offered to 16% of the population, against 12 percent from 2019.

The 16 percent of households stated that their earnings during COVID were affected by more than 50 percent, and 30 percent of households stated that their psychological well-being was substantially affected during COVID.

Annual Status of Education report Pakistan, collects information from children on learning and other critical indicators across rural and urban households alongside schools producing internationally comparable data on the acquisition of foundational lower primary skills, holding national and global-level institutions accountable for delivering on the SDG 4 promises. ASER Pakistan, not only collects data to highlight education challenges across the country, it identifies the most under-privileged areas within Pakistan, surviving under extreme poverty, where girls in rural areas, and the disabled are likely to be most vulnerable. Evidence on learning, disaggregated by geography, gender, inclusion and wealth, generated by ASER/ITA annually propels democratically elected governments to target, plan and spend better with measurable positive outcomes so that they live up to their manifesto promises.

https://thinkerspk.com/2022/03/11/annual-status-education-pakistan/

 

 

Pakistan: 19% children remained out of school in 2021 - World Asia

No serious improvement witnessed in enrollment in last three years, survey says

The survey said the share of private schools has been dropped by 4 per cent as compared to 2019.Image Credit: AFP

Islamabad: In Pakistan, 19 per cent children remained out of school in the outgoing year 2021 and there was no serious improvement noted as the results of the year 2019 and 2021 are almost the same.

According to the annual report — the largest citizen-led household survey titled Annual Status of Education Report (ASER) Pakistan, 2021 — among the children going to schools 81 per cent were enrolled in the government schools whereas 19 per cent were going to the non-state institutions, 1 per cent in Madrassah (religious seminaries).

 

The report also highlighted the progress and challenges in the implementation of Article 25-A of the Constitution of Pakistan, which suggests education for all.

The report said that 40 per cent of the government and 23 per cent of the private sector schools imparted multi-grade teaching till grade 8.

The share of private schools has been dropped by 4 per cent as compared to 2019.

Massive increase in paid coaching

The report highlighted that while children in private schools taking tuition has remained at 22 per cent same as in 2019, the paid coaching has recorded a massive jump for children in the government schools from 6 per cent in 2019 to 20 per cent in 2021.

Increase in tuition in government schools by 14 per cent during COVID-19 is a burden on poor households, it said.

This enrolment edge in government schools poses new challenges for supply side actions in terms of facilities and more spaces and teachers for children who can be accommodated, attend and learn above all in public sector as their fundamental entitlement, the ASER report said.

Learning competencies decline

Student competencies in learning language and arithmetic have declined as only 55 per cent of children from grade 5 could read a story in Urdu, Sindhi or Pashto as compared to 59 per cent in 2019, the report said, adding that only 56 per cent of the surveyed students could read sentences in English while 55 per cent could do digit division.

COVID-19 factor

The report found that enrollment and school preparedness figures have indicated some troublesome aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

With regard to the low enrolment districts in all provinces the report suggested it should be targeted for increased enrolment.

However, this provides limited data on early learning in Pakistan, and particularly with regards to out-of-school children, transition rates, gender, and specific learning environments. To inform better poli-cy, there is a need to collect data and figures on these themes.

https://gulfnews.com/world/asia/pakistan/pakistan-19-children-remained-out-of-school-in-2021-1.86368715

 

Annual Status Of Education In Pakistan -

The 19 percent of children remained out of school in 2021 while the 40 percent of government and 23 percent of private schools imparted multi-grade teaching till grade 8 while multi-grade in grade 2 and 8 has been dropped in government schools due to improved number of teachers and classrooms, said Annual Status Of Education Report (ASER) 2021 launched here on Thursday.

As per report, 81 percent of children were enrolled in government schools whereas 19 percent were going to non-state institutions, 1 in Madrassah. The share of private schools has been dropped by 4 percent as compared with year 2019. This enrolment edge in government schools poses new challenges for supply side actions in terms of facilities and more spaces and teachers for children who can be accommodated, attend and learn above all in public sector as their fundamental entitlement.

The report was based on citizen-led household survey. The Idara-e-Taleem-o-Aagahi (ITA) conducted the survey report in joint collaboration with around 20 organizations and 1,000 volunteer citizens visited 152 districts in 4420 villages to implement the ASER survey from 87,415 households and 247,978 children of age 3-16 years. As per report, for the year 2021, the ASER rural survey assessed 212,105 children of 5-16 year age in Language (Urdu/Sindhi/Pashto), English, and Arithmetic competencies mapped to the Curriculum and Textbooks.

The report till date has further annually informed about the progress and challenges for Article 25 A of the constitution extending education for All 5-16 year old children since 2010 and for tracking progress towards SDG 4, measuring learning at the lower primary level.

Learning lies at the heart of the education enterprise but because of the pandemic and school closures, ASER rural results for 2021 reflect a drop in enrollment for age group 3-5 and 6-16 years.

The share of private schools dropped by 4 percent as compared to year 2019. This enrolment edge in government schools poses new challenges for supply side actions in terms of facilities and more spaces and teachers for children who can be accommodated, attend and learn above all in public sector as their fundamental entitlement.

For the first time during COVID there are more boys which were skewed due to data from Punjab. Boys are presumably going to child labour and dropping out of schools. Vulnerability of our children is on the increase.

The Early Childhood Education (ECE) has been historically tracked by ASER Pakistan. From 2014 when ECE enrolment stood at 39 percent, it has registered marginal decline to 38 percent in 2021). The report stated that although ECE was a critical for foundational learning readiness in literacy and numeracy, but remains largely ignored as a holistic sub-sector addressing the physical, socio-emotional and cognitive domains.

According to the rural portion of the report, the student competencies in learning Language and Arithmetic have declined to 55 percent of class 5 children could read a class 2 level stories in Urdu/Sindhi/Pashto, compared to 59 percent in 2019.

The 51 percent of class 5 children could do two digit division, as compared to 57 percent in 2019. Only for English, the learning levels have improved marginally. The 56 percent of class 5 children could read sentences (class 2 level) compared to 55 percent in 2019. Children enrolled in private schools are performing better in literacy compared to government counterparts and boys outperform girls; however, in numeracy both sectors are at par. Foundational learning trailing from grade 3 remains compromised in grade 5 and even in grade 8! Learning Poverty is on the rise.

The report highlights that whilst children in private schools taking tuition has remained at the same level of 22 percent as in 2019, paid coaching has recorded a massive jump for children in government schools from 6 percent in 2019 to 20 percent in 2021 Increase in tuition in government schools by 14 percent during COVID-19 is a burden on poor households.

Learning support from a high of 68 percent learning support from family members, 57 % availed PTV teleschool sessions, 37 percent had access to smart phones, followed by 29 percent with access to computer, 27 percent to paid tuition, 14 percent digital learning resources and 6 percent accessed radio programs. The support from family in learning during covid-19 (68 percent) is a sign of hope for bridging the home-school divide. Distance / edtech learning solutions must be developed further. Teleschool coverage shows an increase from 35 percent in March 2021 to 57 percent in November 2021.

The Annual Status of Education report further highlighted that school functioning across every district in Pakistan. Overall teacher attendance in surveyed government schools was 90 percent, whereas it was 92 percent in private schools on the day of the survey. Whilst private school teachers were reported to have better qualifications at graduate levels (37 percent) compared to 32 percent in government schools; however, for MA/MSC qualifications, a larger percentage of public sector teachers (27%) have a higher qualification than private counterparts (21 percent).

The 77 percent private primary schools had boundary-walls as compared to 75 percent government primary schools; for functional toilets, the facility was available in 70 percent public and 71 percent private primary schools; safe and conducive environments do affect learning positively across public and private schools. The government must make missing facilities an integral part of school based budgets and not a separate budget head.

The ASER 2021 school level survey, included a “Health and Disability” section; head teachers/teachers were asked questions pertaining to Children with Disabilities (CWDs) and appropriate facilities in their respective schools. Overall, 21 percent of the surveyed government schools reported having children with disabilities, compared to 24 percent of private schools.

The ICT’s Annual Status of Education report 2021 collected information on important civic, social safety net support and 21st century indicators. The technology profile of households is changing rapidly. Compared to 2019 when 66 percent of HHs (rural) who had cell phones, there are 77 percent of households in 2021. Sixty-two percent have smartphones. Amongst mobile users, 89 percent use WhatsApp services, whilst 64% use SMS facility. The 23 percent have internet connection and 18 percent have computer/laptops. 65% of households have TV and 18 percent have radio. Social safety nets are being offered to 16% of the population, against 12 percent from 2019.

The 16 percent of households stated that their earnings during COVID were affected by more than 50 percent, and 30 percent of households stated that their psychological well-being was substantially affected during COVID.

Annual Status of Education report Pakistan, collects information from children on learning and other critical indicators across rural and urban households alongside schools producing internationally comparable data on the acquisition of foundational lower primary skills, holding national and global-level institutions accountable for delivering on the SDG 4 promises. ASER Pakistan, not only collects data to highlight education challenges across the country, it identifies the most under-privileged areas within Pakistan, surviving under extreme poverty, where girls in rural areas, and the disabled are likely to be most vulnerable. Evidence on learning, disaggregated by geography, gender, inclusion and wealth, generated by ASER/ITA annually propels democratically elected governments to target, plan and spend better with measurable positive outcomes so that they live up to their manifesto promises.

https://youarepakistan.com/annual-status-of-education-pakistan/

 

 

 

ASER report launched - Pakistan News International

ISLAMABAD, Mar 10 (APP): The 19 percent of children remained out of school in 2021 while the 40 percent of government and 23 percent of private schools imparted multi-grade teaching till grade 8 while multi-grade in grade 2 and 8 has been dropped in government schools due to improved number of teachers and classrooms.

According to annual status Of education report (ASER) 2021 launched here on Thursday, around 81 percent of children were enrolled in government schools whereas 19 percent were going to non-state institutions, 1 in Madrassah.

The share of private schools has been dropped by 4 percent as compared with year 2019. This enrollment in government schools poses new challenges for supply side actions in terms of facilities and more spaces and teachers for children, who can be accommodated, attend and learn above all in public sector as their fundamental entitlement.

The report was based on citizen-led household survey. The Idara-e-Taleem-o-Aagahi (ITA) conducted the survey report in joint collaboration with around 20 organizations and 1,000 volunteer citizens visited 152 districts in 4420 villages to implement the ASER survey from 87,415 households and 247,978 children of age 3-16 years.

As per report, for the year 2021, the ASER rural survey assessed 212,105 children of 5-16 year age in Language (Urdu/Sindhi/Pashto), English, and Arithmetic competencies mapped to the Curriculum and Textbooks.

The report till date has further annually informed about the progress and challenges for Article 25 A of the constitution extending education for All 5-16 year old children since 2010 and for tracking progress towards SDG 4, measuring learning at the lower primary level.

Learning lies at the heart of the education enterprise but because of the pandemic and school closures, ASER rural results for 2021 reflect a drop in enrollment for age group 3-5 and 6-16 years.

The share of private schools dropped by 4 percent as compared to year 2019.
This enrollment edge in government schools poses new challenges for supply side actions in terms of facilities and more spaces and teachers for children who can be accommodated, attend and learn above all in public sector as their fundamental entitlement.

For the first time during COVID there are more boys which were skewed due to data from Punjab. Boys are presumably going to child labor and dropping out of schools. Vulnerability of our children is on the increase.

The Early Childhood Education (ECE) has been historically tracked by ASER Pakistan. From 2014 when ECE enrollment stood at 39 percent, it has registered marginal decline 38 percent in 2021.

The report stated that although ECE was a critical for foundational learning readiness in literacy and numeracy, but remains largely ignored as a holistic sub-sector addressing the physical, socio-emotional and cognitive domains.

According to the rural portion of the report, the student competencies in learning Language and Arithmetic have declined 55 percent of class 5 children could read a class 2 level story in Urdu/Sindhi/Pashto compared to 59 percent in 2019.

The 51 percent class 5 children could do two digit divisions as compared to 57 percent in 2019. Only for English, the learning levels have improved marginally. The 56 percent class 5 children could read sentences (class 2 level) compared to 55 percent in 2019.

Children enrolled in private schools are performing better in literacy compared to government counterparts and boys outperform girls; however, in numeracy both sectors are at par. Foundational learning trailing from grade 3 remains compromised in grade 5 and even in grade 8! Learning Poverty is on the rise.

The report highlights that whilst children in private schools taking tuition has remained at the same level 22 percent as in 2019, paid coaching has recorded a massive jump for children in government schools from 6 percent in 2019 to 20 percent in 2021 Increase in tuition in government schools by 14 percent during COVID-19 is a burden on poor households.

Learning support from a high of 68 percent learning support from family members, 57 % availed PTV teleschool sessions, 37 percent had access to smart phones, followed by 29 percent with access to computer, 27 percent to paid tuition, 14 percent digital learning resources and 6 percent accessed radio programs.

The support from family in learning during covid-19 (68 percent) is a sign of hope for bridging the home-school divide. distance /edtech learning solutions must be developed further. teleschool coverage shows increase from 35 percent in March 2021 to 57 percent in November 2021.

The ASER report further highlighted that school functioning across every district in Pakistan. Overall teacher attendance in surveyed government schools was 90 percent, whereas it was 92 percent in private schools on the day of the survey.

Whilst private school teachers were reported to have better qualifications at graduate levels (37 percent) compared to 32 percent in government schools; however, for MA/MSC qualifications, a larger percentage of public sector teachers (27%) have a higher qualification than private counterparts (21 percent).

The 77 percent private primary schools had boundary-walls as compared to 75 percent government primary schools; for functional toilets, the facility was available in 70 percent public and 71 percent private primary schools; safe and conducive environments do affect learning positively across public and private schools. The government must make missing facilities an integral part of school based budgets and not a separate budget head.

The ASER 2021 school level survey included a “Health and Disability” section; head teachers/teachers were asked questions pertaining to Children with Disabilities (CWDs) and appropriate facilities in their respective schools. Overall, 21 percent of the surveyed government schools reported having children with disabilities, compared to 24 percent private schools.

The ICT’s ASER 2021 collected information on important civic, social safety net support and 21st century indicators. The technology profile of households is changing rapidly. Compared to 2019 when 66 percent of HHs (rural) who had cell phones, there are 77 percent households in 2021. 62 percent have smart phones.

Amongst mobile users, 89 percent use WhatsApp services, whilst 64% use SMS facility. The 23 percent have internet connection and 18 percent have computer/laptops. 65% households have TV and 18 percent have radio. Social safety nets are being offered to 16% of the population against 12 percent from 2019.

The 16 percent households stated that their earnings during COVID were affected by more than 50 percent and 30 percent households stated that their psychological well-being was substantially affected during COVID.

ASER Pakistan, collects information from children on learning and other critical indicators across rural and urban households alongside schools producing internationally comparable data on the acquisition of foundational lower primary skills, holding national and global-level institutions accountable for delivering on the SDG 4 promises.

ASER Pakistan, not only collects data to highlight education challenges across the country, it identifies the most under-privileged areas within Pakistan, surviving under extreme poverty, where girls in rural areas, and the disabled are likely to be most vulnerable.

Evidence on learning, disaggregated by geography, gender, inclusion and wealth, generated by ASER/ITA annually propels democratically elected governments to target, plan and spend better with measurable positive outcomes so that they live up to their manifesto promises.

https://pni.net.pk/en/features/aser-report-launched/

 

ASER Report Launched - Urdu Point

ASER report launched

 

The 19 percent of children remained out of school in 2021 while the 40 percent of government and 23 percent of private schools imparted multi-grade teaching till grade 8 while multi-grade in grade 2 and 8 has been dropped in government schools due to improved number of teachers and classrooms.

ISLAMABAD, (APP - UrduPoint / Pakistan Point News - 10th Mar, 2022 ) :The 19 percent of children remained out of school in 2021 while the 40 percent of government and 23 percent of private schools imparted multi-grade teaching till grade 8 while multi-grade in grade 2 and 8 has been dropped in government schools due to improved number of teachers and classrooms.

According to annual status Of education report (ASER) 2021 launched here on Thursday, around 81 percent of children were enrolled in government schools whereas 19 percent were going to non-state institutions, 1 in Madrassah.

The share of private schools has been dropped by 4 percent as compared with year 2019. This enrollment in government schools poses new challenges for supply side actions in terms of facilities and more spaces and teachers for children who can be accommodated, attend and learn above all in public sector as their fundamental entitlement.

The report was based on citizen-led household survey. The Idara-e-Taleem-o-Aagahi (ITA) conducted the survey report in joint collaboration with around 20 organizations and 1,000 volunteer citizens visited 152 districts in 4420 villages to implement the ASER survey from 87,415 households and 247,978 children of age 3-16 years.

As per report, for the year 2021, the ASER rural survey assessed 212,105 children of 5-16 year age in Language (Urdu/Sindhi/Pashto), English, and Arithmetic competencies mapped to the Curriculum and Textbooks.

The report till date has further annually informed about the progress and challenges for Article 25 A of the constitution extending education for All 5-16 year old children since 2010 and for tracking progress towards SDG 4, measuring learning at the lower Primary level.

Learning lies at the heart of the education enterprise but because of the pandemic and school closures, ASER rural results for 2021 reflect a drop in enrollment for age group 3-5 and 6-16 years.

The share of private schools dropped by 4 percent as compared to year 2019.

This enrollment edge in government schools poses new challenges for supply side actions in terms of facilities and more spaces and teachers for children who can be accommodated, attend and learn above all in public sector as their fundamental entitlement.

For the first time during COVID there are more boys which were skewed due to data from Punjab. Boys are presumably going to child labor and dropping out of schools. Vulnerability of our children is on the increase.

The Early Childhood Education (ECE) has been historically tracked by ASER PakistanFrom 2014 when ECE enrollment stood at 39 percent, it has registered marginal decline 38 percent in 2021.

The report stated that although ECE was a critical for foundational learning readiness in literacy and numeracy, but remains largely ignored as a holistic sub-sector addressing the physical, socio-emotional and cognitive domains.

According to the rural portion of the report, the student competencies in learning Language and Arithmetic have declined 55 percent of class 5 children could read a class 2 level story in Urdu/Sindhi/Pashto compared to 59 percent in 2019.

The 51 percent class 5 children could do two digit division as compared to 57 percent in 2019. Only for English, the learning levels have improved marginally. The 56 percent class 5 children could read sentences (class 2 level) compared to 55 percent in 2019.

Children enrolled in private schools are performing better in literacy compared to government counterparts and boys outperform girls; however, in numeracy both sectors are at par. Foundational learning trailing from grade 3 remains compromised in grade 5 and even in grade 8! Learning Poverty is on the rise.

The report highlights that whilst children in private schools taking tuition has remained at the same level 22 percent as in 2019, paid coaching has recorded a massive jump for children in government schools from 6 percent in 2019 to 20 percent in 2021 Increase in tuition in government schools by 14 percent during COVID-19 is a burden on poor households.

 

Learning support from a high of 68 percent learning support from family members, 57 % availed ptv teleschool sessions, 37 percent had access to smart phones, followed by 29 percent with access to computer, 27 percent to paid tuition, 14 percent digital learning resources and 6 percent accessed radio programs.

The support from family in learning during covid-19 (68 percent) is a sign of hope for bridging the home-school divide. distance /edtech learning solutions must be developed further. teleschool coverage shows increase from 35 percent in March 2021 to 57 percent in November 2021.

The ASER report further highlighted that school functioning across every district in Pakistan. Overall teacher attendance in surveyed government schools was 90 percent, whereas it was 92 percent in private schools on the day of the survey.

Whilst private school teachers were reported to have better qualifications at graduate levels (37 percent) compared to 32 percent in government schools; however, for MA/MSC qualifications, a larger percentage of public sector teachers (27%) have a higher qualification than private counterparts (21 percent).

The 77 percent private primary schools had boundary-walls as compared to 75 percent government primary schools; for functional toilets, the facility was available in 70 percent public and 71 percent private primary schools; safe and conducive environments do affect learning positively across public and private schools. The government must make missing facilities an integral part of school based budgets and not a separate budget head.

The ASER 2021 school level survey, included a "Health and Disability" section; head teachers/teachers were asked questions pertaining to Children with Disabilities (CWDs) and appropriate facilities in their respective schools. Overall, 21 percent of the surveyed government schools reported having children with disabilities, compared to 24 percent private schools.

The ICT's ASER 2021 collected information on important civic, social safety net support and 21st century indicators. The technology profile of households is changing rapidly. Compared to 2019 when 66 percent of HHs (rural) who had cell phones, there are 77 percent households in 2021. 62 percent have smart phones.

Amongst mobile users, 89 percent use WhatsApp services, whilst 64% use SMS facility. The 23 percent have internet connection and 18 percent have computer/laptops. 65% households have tv and 18 percent have radio. Social safety nets are being offered to 16% of the population against 12 percent from 2019.

The 16 percent households stated that their earnings during COVID were affected by more than 50 percent and 30 percent households stated that their psychological well-being was substantially affected during COVID.

ASER Pakistan, collects information from children on learning and other critical indicators across rural and urban households alongside schools producing internationally comparable data on the acquisition of foundational lower primary skills, holding national and global-level institutions accountable for delivering on the SDG 4 promises.

ASER Pakistan, not only collects data to highlight education challenges across the country, it identifies the most under-privileged areas within Pakistan, surviving under extreme poverty, where girls in rural areas, and the disabled are likely to be most vulnerable.

Evidence on learning, disaggregated by geography, gender, inclusion and wealth, generated by ASER/ITA annually propels democratically elected governments to target, plan and spend better with measurable positive outcomes so that they live up to their manifesto promises.

https://www.urdupoint.com/en/pakistan/aser-report-launched-1482164.html

 

 

State of education - The News International

This year marks the 75th anniversary of the creation of Pakistan. While it is a matter of celebration, it should also be a great cause of concern that we have not been able to enroll all our school-age children in educational institutions in these 75 years. Provision of education to all children is one of the fundamental responsibilities of any state. At least at the school level education should be compulsory and the state should be held responsible if it does not offer free education to all. Normally children of school-going age must start their education not later than five years of age, and for at least ten years this school education should be accessible in every part of the country. No matter how ‘remote’. Pakistan has had the dubious distinction of having one of the highest illiteracy rates and also one of the highest ratios of out-of-school children in the world. Once again, the Annual Status of Education Report (ASER) 2021 by Idara-e-Taleem-o-Agahi (ITA) has revealed that nearly one-fifth of all school-age children in Pakistan remained out of school. This has a direct relation with the level of poverty in the country whereby parents belonging to the lowest socio-economic strata are unable to send their children to school.

While the exact percentage of out-of-school children in Pakistan is reported to be 19 percent, it is noteworthy that those living in extreme poverty also amount to around one-fifth of the total population. Successive governments in Pakistan have developed education policies and have tried to change curricula, but hardly any government has focused on enrolling all children in schools. There appear to be at least two reasons for this: lack of adequate resources allocated to education as Pakistan spends one of the lowest amounts per student in the world; and even the amount that is allocated is spent mostly on salaries and non-developmental heads. Somehow, our public education sector ignores the socio-economic condition of parents. Even if there are schools around, people living in extreme poverty end up sending their children to earn livelihood by child labour. Perhaps, a more comprehensive strategy is needed rather than just developing policies and revising the curriculum. We also need to realise that education cannot be treated like any other commodity which the private sector can provide in a more efficient manner. The profit motive should not be a factor when it comes to public services which will determine the future of our country.

There is also a wide gap between the number of primary schools and middle or secondary schools, resulting in a high dropout ratio after class five. A new strategy must take into account the question of poverty and try to offer incentives to parents so that they are not compelled to send their children to child labour. Managing that comprehensive strategy should be the primary task of education managers. At the moment our education managers are mostly involved in postings and transfers and installing biometric machines. Our state too must consider poverty reduction in earnest so that out-of-school children get enrolled and do not drop out due to economic compulsions. Pakistan spends less than three percent of its GDP on education. This situation must change, otherwise we will not be able to achieve much even by the middle of the 21st century.

Source: https://e.thenews.com.pk/detail?id=66317

 

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